Algonquin Indian Tribe
Indian Tribes
Native American Indian Nations
Abenaki  Acoma  Algonquin  Anishinaabe  Apache
  Arapaho  Assiniboine  Athabascan  Aztec  Blackfeet  
Blackfoot  Caddo  Cayuga  Cheraw  Cherokee
  Cheyenne  Chickasaw  Chicora  Chinook  Chippewa
  Choctaw  Chumash  Coeur d'Alene
  Comanche  Costanoan  Cree  Creek (Muskogee)  Crow  
Dakota  Delaware  Dene  Edisto  Euchee  Flathead
  Gros Ventre  Gwitchan  Haida  Haudenosaunee  
Havasupai  Hidatsa  Ho-Chunk
  Hopi  Huron  Iowa  Iroquois  Kaw  Kawaiisu
  Kickapoo  Kiowa  
Lakota  Lenape  Lumbee  Maliseet  Mandan  Mattaponi
  Maya  Menominee  Metis  MicMac  Mojave  Mohawk  
Mohegan  Mohican  Monacan  Muscogee  Nanticokes
  Narragansett  Navajo  Nez Perce  
Nipmuc  Odawa  Ohlone  Ojibwe  Omaha  Oneida
Onondaga  Osage  Paiute  Pima  Ponca  Potawatomi  
Powhatan  Pueblo  Quapaw  Sac  Salish  Seminole
  Seneca  Shawnee  Shinnecock  Shoshone
Sioux  Tsalagi  
Tuscarora  Ute  Wea  Wichita  Winnebago  Wyandot
  Yavapai  Yokut  Zuni  
" I was born upon the prairie where the wind blew free, and there was nothing to break the light of the sun. I was born where there were no enclosures, and where everything drew free breath. I want to die there, and not within walls." - Ten Bears, Comanche Chief


Family Tree Search


Free Genealogy Search


Free People Search









  Cherokee Indians!


Register for our FREE Newsletter!
Enter your E-mail Address
Enter your First Name
Subscribe    Un-Subscribe  
Received Newsletter Format: Plain Text HTML
This information will not be used for any other purpose
or made available to others for any reason what so ever.
Newsletter includes: American Indian Issues, Genealogy,
Website News, Updates, Etc.





 American Indian Tribes Map & Encyclopedia



Click here to visit Comanche Lodge!




The Algonquins or Algonkins are an aboriginal North American people speaking Algonquin, an Algonquian language. Culturally and linguistically, they are closely related to the Odawa and Ojibwe, with whom they form the larger Anishinaabe grouping. The tribe has also given its name to the much larger group of Algonkian peoples, who stretch from Virginia to the Rocky Mountains and north to Hudson Bay. Most Algonkins, however, live in Quebec; the nine Algonkin bands in that province and one in Ontario have a combined population of about 11,000.

Although theirs was largely a hunting and fishing culture, some Algonkins practiced agriculture and cultivated corn, beans, and squash, the famous "Three Sisters" of indigenous horticulture.

They fought the Iroquois due to their rivalry in the fur trade; and formed an alliance with the Montagnais to the east in 1570.

From 1603 they allied themselves with the French under Samuel de Champlain. In 1632, after Sir David Kirke's occupation of New France had demonstrated French colonial vulnerability, the French began to trade muskets to the Algonkins and other aboriginal allies. French Jesuits began to actively seek Algonkin conversions to Roman Catholicism, opening up a bitter divide between traditionalists and converts.

Starting in 1721, many Christian Algonkins began to summer at Oka, a Mohawk settlement near Montreal that was then considered one of the Seven Nations of Canada. Algonkin warriors continued to fight in alliance with France until the British conquest of Quebec in 1760. Fighting on behalf of British Crown, the Algonkins took part in the Barry St Leger campaign during the American Revolutionary War.

Loyalist settlers began encroaching on Algonkin lands shortly after the Revolution. Later, the lumber industry began to move up the Ottawa valley, and the Algonkins were relegated to a string of small reserves.

In recent years, tensions with the lumber industry have flared up again among Algonkin communities, in response to the practice of clear-cutting. In Ontario, an ongoing Algonkin land claim has, since 1983, called into dispute much of the southeastern part of the province, stretching from near North Bay to near Hawkesbury and including Ottawa, Pembroke, and most of Algonquin Provincial Park.

In 2000, Algonkins from Timiskaming First Nation played a significant part in the local popular opposition to the plan to convert Adams Mine into a garbage dump.